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Detect Diabetes early!

The latest guidelines for diabetes screening in adults emphasize earlier and more frequent testing to improve early detection and management.

1. American Diabetes Association (ADA):

- Screening Age: The ADA recommends screening all adults starting at age 35, regardless of risk factors. This is a shift from the previous threshold of 45 years.

- High-Risk Populations: For individuals with overweight or obesity (BMI ≥25 or ≥23 for Asian Americans), screening should start earlier if they have additional risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, or a family history of diabetes [oai_citation:1,The American Diabetes Association Releases the Standards of Care in Diabetes—2024](https://diabetes.org/newsroom/press-releases/american-diabetes-association-releases-standards-care-diabetes-2024) [oai_citation:2,Standards of Care in Diabetes | American Diabetes Association](https://professional.diabetes.org/standards-of-care).

- Frequency: If initial results are normal, repeat screening every three years. Those with prediabetes should be tested annually [oai_citation:3,Standards of Care in Diabetes | American Diabetes Association](https://professional.diabetes.org/standards-of-care) [oai_citation:4,Recommendation: Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes: Screening | United States Preventive Services Taskforce](https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/recommendation/screening-for-prediabetes-and-type-2-diabetes).

2. US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF):

- Screening Age: The USPSTF also recommends starting screening at age 35 for adults with overweight or obesity. This aligns with ADA's guidance and underscores the importance of earlier detection [oai_citation:5,Recommendation: Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes: Screening | United States Preventive Services Taskforce](https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/recommendation/screening-for-prediabetes-and-type-2-diabetes).

- Risk-Based Screening: Emphasizes screening based on risk factors, including family history, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and history of gestational diabetes, regardless of age [oai_citation:6,Recommendation: Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes: Screening | United States Preventive Services Taskforce](https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/recommendation/screening-for-prediabetes-and-type-2-diabetes).

3. Screening Methods:

- Tests: Recommended screening tests include fasting plasma glucose, 2-hour plasma glucose during a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test, and HbA1c levels. These tests help identify both diabetes and prediabetes [oai_citation:7,New diabetes guidelines: Screen patients aged 45 and older | American Medical Association](https://www.ama-assn.org/delivering-care/diabetes/new-diabetes-guidelines-screen-patients-aged-45-and-older) [oai_citation:8,Recommendation: Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes: Screening | United States Preventive Services Taskforce](https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/recommendation/screening-for-prediabetes-and-type-2-diabetes).

4. Other Considerations:

- Technological Integration: The ADA's latest guidelines also stress the use of digital tools, telehealth, and artificial intelligence for screening and managing diabetes, especially in improving access and outcomes [oai_citation:9,The American Diabetes Association Releases the Standards of Care in Diabetes—2024](https://diabetes.org/newsroom/press-releases/american-diabetes-association-releases-standards-care-diabetes-2024).

- Special Populations: Additional guidance is provided for populations with higher risk factors, such as those with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and those on new obesity medications [oai_citation:10,Standards of Care in Diabetes | American Diabetes Association](https://professional.diabetes.org/standards-of-care).

These updates reflect a broader effort to enhance early diagnosis and intervention, leveraging new technologies and personalized approaches to diabetes care. For more detailed information, you can refer to the American Diabetes Association's Standards of Care and the USPSTF recommendations.

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